The Second Wave

rddia.gif (938 bytes) Eddie Cochran  rddia.gif (938 bytes) The Everly Brothers   rddia.gif (938 bytes) Buddy Holly  
rddia.gif (938 bytes) Jerry Lee Lewis   rddia.gif (938 bytes) Ricky Nelson rddia.gif (938 bytes) Ritchie Valens

The above were the most prominent of the new singers that appeared in 1957. They had a clean cut look and they sang a new type of rock.  Their songs had innocent lyrics, melodic "hooks" and  were hummable tunes while keeping the beat, excitement and vitality.

Less explosive then their rock and roll predecessors, they brought something new and innovative. What they lacked in chaotic energy was more the compensated with thoughtful lyrics that spoke to the hearts and minds of teenagers, helping them to come to terms with the confusing contradictions of adolescence.

The Everly's and Nelson's careers would continue into the Sixties and their styles would change with the times. By the time of the British Invasion their careers had largely faded as their songs lost the focus and the rock and roll grounding of their earlier works.

Cochran and Holly both were genuine rockabillys before developing their own songwriting, guitar and production styles. They were both creative and adaptable and could have given the pop world of the early sixties the depth and energy that it needed, but that was not to be as they dead young. Cochran in an automobile accident and Holly in a plane crash, with Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper.